Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Research: Why pillow talk matters

Chatting immediately after sex makes couples feel closer and more secure, claims scientist
Chatting immediately after sex makes couples feel closer and more secure, claims scientist

- Researcher at the University of Connecticut, examined link between amount of oxytocin in a person's body and communication after sex

- Men and women experience a post-climax oxytocin surge but testosterone is believed to dampen the effects so men typically fell less affectionate

- Professor Amanda Denes found women who orgasmed disclosed more intimate feelings to their partner after sex than women who did not orgasm

Many people feel more comfortable revealing their true feelings, hopes and stresses to a partner after sex and now one researcher thinks she knows why.
Amanda Denes believes pillow talk is an undervalued ingredient in a satisfying and enduring relationship and is linked to the production of the 'trust hormone' called oxytocin, which is released after orgasm.
She found that women who orgasmed disclosed more intimate feelings to their partner after sex than women who did not orgasm, which increased the emotional bond between couples.

The Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Connecticut, became interested in investigating the role of pillow talk in relationships as people have such different experiences of it.
Many people said they open up about their feelings to a partner after sex regardless of the length of a relationship – a time period described as the post-coital time interval (PCTI) by researchers Daniel Kruger and Susan Hughes.

When individuals experience orgasm, physiological changes occur as a hormone called oxytocin floods their bodies.
Increases in this ‘trust hormone’ have been linked to many socially beneficial behaviors.

Both men and women experience a post-climax oxytocin surge but testosterone is believed to dampen the effects so that men typically fell less warm and fuzzy after sex.

Professor Denes found that women who orgasmed disclosed more intimate feelings to their partner after sexual activity than women who did not orgasm.

Professor Denes believes that oxytocin is the reason why, as women who climax have more of the hormone in their systems, which increases feelings of trust and connection, than women who did not, influencing individuals’ decisions to talk about their feelings to their partners.

She explained that women may talk more about their feelings after sex than men as men’s higher levels of testosterone suppresses the oxytocin response.

Individuals in a committed relationship perhaps unsurprisingly disclosed more intimate feelings to their partners after sex than those in newer or more short-term relationships, Professor Denes said.
A previous study found that the afterglow of an orgasm minimises the risks and increases the benefits of disclosing personal information.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2528875/Why-pillow-talk-matters-Chatting-immediately-sex-makes-couples-feel-closer-secure-claims-scientist.html#ixzz2p6fApYq6 

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